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DNA recovered from ancient skeletons reveals that the genetic makeup of modern Europe was established around 4,500 B.C. in the mid-Neolithic—or 6,500 years ago—
22052014. News Photo. CAMERON BURNELL/FAIRFAX NZ. Professor Alan Cooper who is about to publish his findings on the origin of the kiwi poses with a Stewart Island Kiwi Skeleton and the thigh bone from the Elephant bird found in Madagascar which is the Kiwi's closest relative.and not by the first farmers who arrived in the area around 7,500 years ago or by earlier hunter-gatherer groups. “The genetics show that something around that point caused the genetic signatures of previous populations to disappear,” said Alan Cooper, director of the Australian Centre for Ancient DNA at the University of Adelaide, where the research was performed.”However, we don’t know what happened or why, and [the mid-Neolithic] has not been previously identified as [a time] of major change,” he said. Furthermore, the origins of the mid-Neolithic populations that did form the basis of modern Europe are also unknown. “This population moves in around 4,000 to 5,000 [B.C.], but where it came from remains a mystery, as we can’t see anything like it in the areas surrounding Europe,” Cooper said. (Source) 22052014. (Photo) Professor Alan Cooper who is about to publish his findings on the origin of the kiwi poses with a Stewart Island Kiwi Skeleton and the thigh bone from the Elephant bird found in Madagascar which is the Kiwi’s closest relative.

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