Tags

, ,

imageedit_1_8718966633

Ultraviolet (UV) light kills cells by damaging their DNA. The light initiates a reaction between two molecules of thymine, one of the bases that make up DNA. The resulting is very stable, but repair of this kind of DNA damage–usually by excising or removing the two bases and filling in the gaps with new nucleotides–is fairly efficient. Even so, it breaks down when the damage is extensive.The longer the exposure to UV light, the more thymine dimers are formed in the DNA and the greater the risk of an incorrect repair or a “missed” dimer.  If cellular processes are disrupted because of an incorrect repair or remaining damage, the cell cannot carry out its normal functions. At this point, there are two possibilities, depending on the extent and location of the damage. If the damage is not too extensive, cancerous or precancerous cells are created from healthy cells. If it is widespread, the cell will die. (SOURCEHow Ultraviolet (UV) Light attacks the recessive gene Devil’s cells & damages their DNA)